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Monday, March 2, 2009

A Twink and a Hink?


Fired Up! is the latest throwback to 1980's teen sex comedies that is currently playing in multiplexes across North America. It's the kind of thing I would never pay to see but will probably watch when it shows up on cable TV (in about three weeks).

Incidentally, Nicholas D'Agosto is one month away from his 29th birthday. Eric Christian Olsen is almost 33. They play high school students. Will the madness never end?

7 comments:

J.D. said...

I LOVE NICK D'AGOSTO.

Vera said...

Oh, I'd totally bear his children. But he really does need to stop playing high school kids.

p.s. I heart Rocket Science.

J.D. said...

Well, if him playing a high school kid entails him wearing only pom-poms, I would rather he not stop, thank you.

Also, yay. <3

William said...

Hairy tufts & smooth chests. Best of both worlds. So hot.

seanisbored said...

Never going to see this movie. But I will spend 90 minutes looking at stills of those two.

The age thing is ridiculous, I'm pretty sure there are good looking 18 year olds that can (half-decently) act!


p.s. my word verification was 'Chelity'. It's lovely sounding.

Mike Ellis, The Jolly Reprobate said...

30-year-olds playing high school students may go a long way to explaining why so many actual high school students have warped ideas of what they're supposed to look like. Too many perfectly normal kids put themselves down because they don't look like grown men when they're just 17.

p0o0 said...

Well, you know the United States of Anti-sexuality: If a film even hints at a high school student being involved in an "adult situation" or "adult theme", there's no way anyone under 25 could ever play the character. We haven't always been this way; American society has shifted toward the conservative with respect to sexuality in movies, and toward the anarchic with respect to violence in movies. A movie rated R in 2009 for its sexual content would likely be rated PG-13 or even PG in the early 90's or before. Exactly the opposite is true with violence. Such a shame.

And 30-year-olds portraying 17-year-olds in the movies work both ways, to follow along Mike Ellis's comment: Not only does it give 17-y/o's a false sense of "normal", but it also gives parents and society at large a false sense of "what a 17-y/o is" as well. How is a person to know what a 17-y/o looks like when he sees only 30-y/o's claiming to be 17? All the legitimately 17-y/o's look too young to be 17. It warps everyone's sense of what is typical.