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Saturday, August 8, 2015

Blast From The Past


Summer 1992.  Ryan Phillippe in his first professional role, plays Billy Douglas, the first gay teenager in an American soap opera on ABC's One Life To Live.  Your Auntie Vera was riveted. Watch below as Billy comes out to Father Andrew Carpenter (Andrew Krimmer) while devious Marty (Susan Haskell) eavesdrops.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Now, thanks for sharing that little treasure!
Ryan's such a pretty thing....gotta envy Reverend Carpenter..
luke

Wistynook said...

THANKS for this post. Ryan is one of my favorite actors. I did not see anything on tv about him. Only movies. ;-)

Pitbullshark said...

While I definitely knew about that role, I never saw that show, so I greatly appreciate your bringing it to us. It was painful to watch for several reasons. For one thing, I remember back to those days and how painful and possibly dangerous those disclosures were and how society acted about them. I had almost forgotten how badly homosexuality was treated not too long ago. This was all so heavy, here, particularly with the added dramatic perturbation of that evil girl and the false implications of the minister, the despicable Dad wanting to kick his gay son out of the house, all of that (which still goes on in some cases). Also painful was how fantastic of an actor Ryan was those scenes...I give credit to him, or the writer of the screenplay, or possibly the director...maybe to all three. But I almost feel that that was the best work Ryan had ever done, and that was at the beginning of his career.

Also, he was so beautiful in that. My first exposure to him was "White Squall" (which, in my view, was a feast of hot boyflesh almost on the order of "The Outsiders", although not to the great extent of that). I instantly became a huge fan of Ryan Philippe that lasted and maybe even increased through movies like "Little Boy Blue", "I Know What You Did Last Summer", "54" (probably THE classic Ryan Philippe movie), "Playing By Ear", and "Cruel Intentions". By the time we got to "Gosford Park" and "Igby Goes Down", I had lost all interest. This might have been somewhat concurrent to his divorce from Reese Witherspoon, "due to his envy of her greater success than his own", according to the gossip mill. The only movie he has been in since that time that I ever saw was "The Lincoln Lawyer" but I didn't even remember (or care) that he was in it. I actually own DVDs of "The I Inside" and "The Secrets of Lake Success" (from way back near the beginning of his career), but so far, I have never bothered to watch them. COMMENT CONTINUED BELOW

Pitbullshark said...

It seems that your system is no longer accepting comments on this entry, which I think is bizarre.

Vera said...

Any comments left after two days must be approved for posting. Otherwise I get a lot of spam on my older posts.

Re: Your comment above: You should watch Secrets of Lake Success,if only for a few scenes. Ryan's role isn't huge, but it was the very first thing he did after OLTL, and he has a completely gratuitous, if quite lovely, shirtless scene.

Pitbullshark said...

COMMENT CONCLUDED:

Thank you for that explanation about the approval. Since the first portion of my comment actually did get posted after all, let me give you the second part here:

I don't like how he looks now at all; he's always scuzzy and unshaven, always going around wearing wife-beaters, too bulked up, and too many tattoos. I don't like his attitudes, either.

No, it isn't that a person can't "grow up" and still retain their beauty and appeal, very many do, but I feel that he somehow threw away the special qualities he had, to become, instead, a "I don't really care" kind of Los Angeles style "stud" ( the kind who feels that their success makes it okay for them roam around looking like a slob). And to see these film clips that you posted and the others that YouTube also presented, it's just a painful shame to see what he was before and what he had grown older to become. I don't think he is BAD, but I just don't care any more. Maybe I mourn my own caring.